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  FIE 2000

New Faculty Fellows

FIE 2000 is pleased to announce that eight New Faculty Fellows have agreed to join us in Kansas City! Each year, FIE invites new engineering and computer science faculty to submit application packets for possible selection as a New Faculty Fellows. The fellowship provides a travel grant for documented conference travel expenses of up to $1000. We expect that new faculty fellows will be passionate about engineering and computer science education. We also expect that new faculty fellows will attend the entire conference, present their peer-reviewed paper, attend one workshop, and attend all special sessions that have been organized specifically for the fellows. A rigorous peer-reviewed application process is used to select the fellows. The review panel is composed of engineering and computer science faculty from the assistant, associate, and full professorship levels.

The FIE 2000 New Faculty Fellows are:

CHEATING: STUDENT ATTITUDES AND PRACTICAL APPROACHES TO DEALING WITH IT

Trevor S. Harding
Kettering University
Manufacturing Engineering Program
Flint, MI 48504-4898

Abstract--The preliminary results of educational research conducted at Kettering University is described in which students in an introductory Engineering Materials course (MFGE-370) were asked to complete a survey on their perceptions of cheating. The overall objective of the research was to determine those things students believed constituted cheating, the frequency to which they cheat and their attitudes about what steps could be taken to curtail cheating within a course. Practical approaches to effectively dealing with cheating are also discussed including using learning objectives for writing fair tests, promoting group work through cooperative learning teams, holding review sessions before tests and building a good rapport with students. Data were gathered from 65 students in two offerings of the course.

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THE CHANGING FACE OF CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION METHODS:
SERVICE LEARNING AND DESIGN IN A ROBOTICS COURSE

Rosalyn S. Hobson
Virginia Commonwealth University
Electrical Engineering
POB 843072
Richmond, VA 23284

Abstract--Service-learning is a form of instruction which uses community service activities as part of the medium for learning. There are two components: (a) service which actively engages the student in community service, and (b) focused-directed learning. Service learning enhances the engineering curriculum by linking engineering directly to improving society, which makes the profession more appealing and more divers. At Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), service-learning has been incorporated into the Robotics course. VCU students work with other students from local high schools to design and construct a mobile robot within time, materials and cost constraints. These robots compete in the For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology: FIRST Competition. This paper describes service-learning and the Robotics course and how the two are incorporated to enhance the educational experience of the VCU and high school students and provide a service to the Richmond, Virginia community.

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VIRTUAL REALITY AND LEARNING BY DESIGN: TOOLS FOR INTEGRATING MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CONCEPTS

Tom Impelluso and Tina Metoyer
San Diego State University
Department of Mechanical Engineering
San Diego, CA 92182-4512

Abstract--The Department of Mechanical Engineering at San Diego State University recently began to re-design its introductory mechanical engineering courses. The objectives of these newly designed courses are to incorporate the "learner as designer" strategy and to positively impact students' conceptual understanding of mechanical engineering concepts. To achieve these objectives, the courses are designed to use virtual reality as a tool that integrates the fundamental concepts of design, analysis, and manufacturing. The first implementation of one of these courses afforded an opportunity to study a particular type of "learner as designer" strategy-the "learner as instructional designer strategy." This paper describes the course and the impact of the "learner as instructional designer strategy" on students' conceptual understanding of and attitude towards mechanical engineering concepts.

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DEVELOPING A WEB-ENHANCED COURSE: A CASE STUDY

Philip T. McCreanor
Mercer University
School of Engineering

Abstract--This paper presents a case study on the incorporation of web-based teaching tools into a senior level engineering course on solid waste management. This course was originally taught with two 75 minute weekly sessions in the traditional lecture and chalkboard format. The class progressed over seven semesters to become a web-enhanced course which met once per week for 75 minutes. The primary phases of course evolution were development and teaching of the course in a lecture and chalkboard format, construction of a class web-site which included lecture notes and links to important internet sites, development and incorporation of on-line interactive quizzes using CyberProf internet software, relocation and re-organization of the existing site materials into the Web CT environment, and development of the final web-enhanced course.

This paper will present the course development history and a discussion of the successes and pitfalls encountered during the course evolution.

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EAST MEETS WEST: MAKING THE BEST OF TWO WORLDS

Yu Morton
Miami University
Department of Manufacturing Engineering
Oxford, OH 45056

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LOOKING TO THE FUTURE: WOMEN IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Barbara M. Moskal
Colorado School of Mines
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Golden, CO 80401

Abstract--As a result of the overall decrease in enrollment in science related fields and recent economic expansions, the United States is experiencing a shortage of trained scientists and engineers. One manner in which to increase the pool of scientists and engineers is to increase the participation of women in these fields. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the progress that has been made and the issues that still need to be addressed in order to attract women to the fields of science and engineering.

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ROLE OF CONSULTING ENGINEERING EXPERIENCES
FOR CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY FACULTY AND
OTHER ENGINEERING EDUCATORS IN THE NEXT CENTURY

Andrew T. Rose
University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown
225 Engineering and Science Building
Johnstown, PA 15904

Abstract--Remaining "current" in one's field is a requirement for promotion and tenure in engineering and engineering technology faculty positions. ABET [1] also requires that the engineering curriculum remain current. Technology and engineering, however, are changing at an ever-increasing pace. In the next century, engineering educators will be challenged to keep up with an increasing number of new developments within their fields of expertise. Research and industrial experiences are often used to maintain currency. Incorporating these experiences into the curriculum keeps the education of future engineers and engineering technologists current, as well. Industrial experiences for civil engineering faculty often involve relationships with local consulting engineering firms. Consulting experiences with local firms can provide multiple benefits for civil engineering faculty and their students at small teaching institutions. This paper discusses consulting engineering as a means of remaining current in the practice of civil engineering and integrating consulting experiences into the curriculum. Also discussed are the benefits of consulting experiences for professional development of civil engineering technology faculty.

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A CASE FOR ENGINEERING EDUTAINMENT IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Michael Usrey
University of Colorado
Lockheed-Martin Engineering Management Program
CB 433 Boulder, CO 80309

Abstract--The economic future of the United States depends upon our continued leadership in the development of high technology products and services. Development of such products requires a robust engineering workforce. Unfortunately, current economic, market, employment, and education trends suggest erosion of America's global engineering leadership. A definition of engineering edutainment is developed herein. Reasons why some engineering professors are dismayed by the concept of edutainment are discussed. A call is made for engineering edutainmnet that spans almost all U.S. demographic groups from cradle to grave. This holistic approach is offered as the only viable model for building the foundation for the engineering workforce of the next century. It is put forth that the holistic approach is best accomplished through alliances including engineering faculty, K-12 educators, and practitioners from industry. Finally, guidelines to avoid the pitfalls of edutainment are provided.

 

 

 

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